EU Institutions vs. Democracy

by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz  |  March 29, 2017  |  ARTICLES

The Eurocrats no longer pretend that democratic legitimacy is necessary. It is enough that the club outvotes the people, who remain disenfranchised on the sidelines. In this manner, the Tusk affair sheds perfect light on the inner machinations of the European Union.

Representatives of twenty-seven EU countries voted for the reelection of Donald Tusk to the European Council against the express wishes of the country he was supposed to represent: Poland. But, it is now obvious, he does not represent his country of origin.

Instead, we witness yet another charade, and a tug of war between the global elitists and the local people of Europe. The Eurocrats no longer pretend that democratic legitimacy is necessary. It is enough that the club outvotes the people, who remain disenfranchised on the sidelines. In this manner, the Tusk affair sheds perfect light on the inner machinations of the European Union.

This prompts a question: who nominated Tusk? No one really knows. The rules are unclear, or perhaps they don't exist. Hitherto, all successive candidates for the presidency of the EC enjoyed the backing of their national governments. That most likely allowed one to dispense with the rules and, instead, to treat the vote as a pro forma gesture in the affirmative as an expression of the EU consensus. But now, because of the Poles, there was no consensus.

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