General Jajko discusses "Warsaw Pact: Wartime Statutes-Instruments of Soviet Control"

April 14, 2011  |  PRESS RELEASES

On April 5, 2011, IWP professor General Walter Jajko participated in a panel at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars on the topic of the "Warsaw Pact: Wartime Statutes-Instruments of Soviet Control."

Please visit the Wilson Center website for a video and more details.

Please click here for the paper he presented at the panel: Download file Walter Jajko on Warsaw Pact, 4-5-2011 

In this paper, Gen. Jajko explains that the Warsaw Pact demonstrated beyond any doubt that the sovereignty of Moscow's Central and Eastern European satellites - handed over to Soviet control as a result of the Yalta Conference at the conclusion of the Second World War - was a mere charade. As he points out, the decision to launch a war against NATO would originate solely in Moscow and was conveyed directly to the Warsaw Pact armies, thereby bypassing any of the "allies'" governmental or party structures.

The Kremlin's control generated resentment even amongst the generally compliant puppet regimes throughout the Non-Soviet Warsaw Pact states. Yet NATO failed to exploit and exacerbate tensions, thereby implicitly affirming Soviet domination in that part of the world. It is significant that we know much about the Warsaw Pact and Moscow's war plans from a defector from the Polish General Staff, the heroic Col. Ryszard Kukliński.

Gen. Jajko also asks scholars and strategists to ponder the following crucial question: what exactly can be learned from what deterred the Soviets from war that is relevant today?