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In-Person Courses

ID

CREDITS

COURSE NAME

PROFESSOR(S)

IWP 601 / IWPO 601
4 credits
IWP 601 / IWPO 601
4 credits

"An appreciation of how national security policies are developed, and, more importantly, implemented, is surprisingly overlooked in most schools that teach a course like this."
-S. John Tsagronis

S. John Tsagronis, Jeff Johnson
IWP 603
4 credits
IWP 603
4 credits

The essential focus of this course is to fathom the causes and consequences of the disintegration of the communist system, and to examine the political, ideological and economic changes in post-Soviet Russia.

Marek Jan Chodakiewicz, John Lenczowski, Ph.D.
IWP 605 / IWPO 605
4 credits
IWP 605 / IWPO 605
4 credits

This course examines the elements and purpose of intelligence, requirements of successful intelligence analysis, intelligence processes, counterintelligence and security, the relationship between intelligence and policy, and how American political and cultural values affect the role of intelligence in America.

David L. Thomas
IWP 606 / IWPO 606
2 credits
IWP 606 / IWPO 606
2 credits

This course covers the role of ideas in international politics and the practical application of ideas to the conduct of foreign policy. It is an introductory survey which serves in many ways as the conceptual core of the Institute’s approach to the study of international

Joshua Muravchik, Timothy McCranor
IWP 608 / IWPO 608
2 credits
IWP 608 / IWPO 608
2 credits

This course examines the founding principles of American political philosophy and how they define the national purposes that form the basis of U.S. foreign policy. The course covers the underlying structure and principles of the American political order as the basis of national security policy

Dennis Teti
IWP 609
4 credits
IWP 609
4 credits

In most international affairs curricula, economics is taught with a principal focus on trade, economic development, foreign aid, and international finance. What is frequently missing is that dimension of economics which concerns national security policy. This course covers that dimension.

David Glancy
IWP 610 / IWPO 610
4 credits
IWP 610 / IWPO 610
4 credits
This course examines the role of counterintelligence as an essential element of U.S. national security strategy, and the importance of counterintelligence in international relations. The course will approach counterintelligence from the following perspectives: legal, ethical, historical, operational, epistemological, and national-strategic.
David L. Thomas
IWP 615 / IWPO 615
2 credits
IWP 615 / IWPO 615
2 credits

The course will stress the role of ethics and natural law within the context of statecraft. It will examine the use of moral reasoning and prudence in helping to achieve the twin goals of an ethical foreign policy and the protection of the national interest.

Timothy McCranor, Dennis Teti
IWP 616 / IWPO 616
4 credits
IWP 616 / IWPO 616
4 credits

This course will examine the many threats-current and emerging-to the security of the United States; the strategic planning efforts undertaken to address them; our abilities to manage crises when they emerge; and, the challenges of statecraft in shaping crises to our advantage. Students will become

S. John Tsagronis
IWP 620 / IWPO 620
4 credits
IWP 620 / IWPO 620
4 credits

This course examines the most significant developments which have made the 20th century the most violent and revolutionary era in world history. In addition, it explains the continuity of the legacy of the 20th century into the Second Millenium as evidenced by the political and

Marek Jan Chodakiewicz
IWP 622
2 credits
IWP 622
2 credits

This course is designed to give students a comprehensive understanding of the intelligence and counterintelligence systems of selected foreign states, as contrasted with the intelligence and counterintelligence traditions of the United States.

John J. Quattrocki
IWP 625
4 credits
IWP 625
4 credits

The purpose of this course is to help students develop a deeper appreciation of the underlying conditions that provoke conflict and, conversely, that may produce lasting peace, justice, and political order. This course introduces the larger dimensions surrounding the issues of peace, war, and conflict

Albert Santoli, John J. Tierney, Jr.