The tragic cycle of genocide denial has returned: This time, Nigeria

The Age of Terrorism that is now upon us has proven to be the greatest modern challenge to the legitimacy of all governments and international organizations who claim a commitment to human rights. Nowhere is this more evident today than in Nigeria, where terrorist violence and mass slaughter by Islamist groups are reaching genocidal proportions. When President…

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Remembering Pat Derian, human rights activist

Undoubtedly, few readers will remember this name, yet she was the chief architect of American foreign policy during the Carter Administration, 1977 – 1981. She was neither Secretary of State, nor a member of the National Security Council. Her background was exclusively domestic, as an activist for civil and voting rights for blacks in Mississippi…

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Isolationism: The People’s Choice

George Washington’s 1796 Farewell Address set the stage for more than 150 years of “isolationism” for American foreign policies. While the advice was challenged prior to both world wars and brought the U.S. into each, the idea of abstention from external political affairs became a near-sacred political “theology” for most American history. Even after it…

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The Second Civil War

There’s an old political adage, “the job of the opposition is to oppose.” Makes sense, and what would a democracy be without opposition? Kings, dictators, and military officers are not known for their patience with political dissent. But when the job of the opposition is to “remove, replace,” we have an altogether different situation. Us…

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Do Elections Shape Foreign Policies?

Readers may know the immediate answer to this question by thinking about their motivations in the last presidential election. Was foreign policy the determinate factor between Trump, a realtor and media personality, and Hillary Clinton, a former Senator and Secretary of State? The same may be done for other, previous contests since the end of…

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Hong Kong’s struggle against China’s new Iron Curtain

Anyone who loves the unique culture of Hong Kong can sympathize with the demonstrators who are protesting the latest step in a long process of Hong Kong being absorbed by mainland China. The subjugation of Hong Kong to the full weight of the PRC’s oppressive legal system is like watching a beautiful flower being crushed…

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A Gay War in Gay Vatican

In their controversial The Pink Swastika: Homosexuality in the Nazi Party (Sacramento, CA: Veritas Aeterna Press, 2002) Scott Lively and Kevin Abrams reduced the interwar decade in Germany to the struggle between “butches” and “fairies”. The former were Nazis, while the latter leftists: liberals, socialists, and communists. Quite simply, in this telling, the 1920s and 1930s witnessed…

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The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming

The classic comedy film (1966), of the same name, depicts the adventures of a Russian crew whose submarine goes aground off a New England beach. While essentially a theatrical farce, the movie tried to bring out some of the absurdities and misunderstandings between the two sides at the height of the Cold War. In a…

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Geopolitics in an Aerospace Age

To simplify, analysis can be either “traditional” or “progressive.” The first views the past to reach the future, the second views the past as an impediment for the future. Alone, both are hazardous for serious analysis. Together, they both are needed for the same. There is an old expression, “Keep your eyes on the horizon,…

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