The Second Civil War

There’s an old political adage, “the job of the opposition is to oppose.” Makes sense, and what would a democracy be without opposition? Kings, dictators, and military officers are not known for their patience with political dissent. But when the job of the opposition is to “remove, replace,” we have an altogether different situation. Us…

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Do Elections Shape Foreign Policies?

Readers may know the immediate answer to this question by thinking about their motivations in the last presidential election. Was foreign policy the determinate factor between Trump, a realtor and media personality, and Hillary Clinton, a former Senator and Secretary of State? The same may be done for other, previous contests since the end of…

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Hong Kong’s struggle against China’s new Iron Curtain

Anyone who loves the unique culture of Hong Kong can sympathize with the demonstrators who are protesting the latest step in a long process of Hong Kong being absorbed by mainland China. The subjugation of Hong Kong to the full weight of the PRC’s oppressive legal system is like watching a beautiful flower being crushed…

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The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming

The classic comedy film (1966), of the same name, depicts the adventures of a Russian crew whose submarine goes aground off a New England beach. While essentially a theatrical farce, the movie tried to bring out some of the absurdities and misunderstandings between the two sides at the height of the Cold War. In a…

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Geopolitics in an Aerospace Age

To simplify, analysis can be either “traditional” or “progressive.” The first views the past to reach the future, the second views the past as an impediment for the future. Alone, both are hazardous for serious analysis. Together, they both are needed for the same. There is an old expression, “Keep your eyes on the horizon,…

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Poland’s EU elections

The recent EU electoral results are a mixed bag: the Greens ride high in Germany; the leftists dominate Spain; the populists were cut to size in Denmark (a surprise); and they stumbled in Austria (not a surprise). Predictably, the Brexit Party scored high in the UK; the rest put on a lackluster show. Elsewhere it…

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Israel’s self-inflicted political wounds

In recent years, Israel has been establishing itself as the principal geopolitical counterweight to Iran in the southwestern portion of the Middle East. With its overwhelming scientific, technological and military superiority, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states (with the exception of Qatar) are increasingly accepting Israeli leadership. Now, however, after years of extensive defense…

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The People are the Press

We’ve now observed the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre — one of the most dramatic events in modern Chinese history where pro-democracy student protestors were slaughtered en masse by their own government. But most people in China today do not even know that Tiananmen Square occurred — thanks to the power of China’s “Great Wall”…

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Is China a Permanent Enemy?

If there is any word that should be removed from the world politics vocabulary, it is “permanent.” The subject, i.e. foreign policy, international politics, has a history that almost makes a mockery of the adjective and testifies to a near-total lack of anything durable within its midst. The only thing, tragically, that seems to endure…

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