IWP Library

Winter break reading suggestions from IWP professors

In case you are not already reading ahead for the spring semester, we asked IWP faculty members for suggestions for additional winter break reading. Their thoughts may be found below. From Professor John Sano: To Catch A Spy by James Olson. Jim is the former Chief of Counterintelligence at the CIA, with a long and…

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Boris and Donald: Blondes Have More Fun

The recent electoral victory of Boris Johnson in Britain ensures that, with some certainty, both countries will be led by men who share more in common than a similar and unique investment in political democracy (“never Trumpers” notwithstanding). Not only do they share some common personality traits, plus similar impulses toward nationalistic isolation but, more…

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Missile Defense for Great Power Conflict: Outmaneuvering the China Threat

This article co-authored by IWP professor Rebeccah Heinrichs appeared in the winter 2019 edition of Strategic Studies Quarterly, published by Air University Press. China is modernizing its military to establish regional hegemony in the near term and global preeminence in the far term. The People’s Liberation Army’s crown jewel is its massive arsenal of missiles…

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A Tale of Two Countries: American History 101, 102

If one wonders why there is so much division today, one need look no further than the two most popular textbooks in American history to discover why. The first, Thomas A. Bailey’s The American Pageant, 1956, interprets the country along traditional lines that emphasized a fairly benign approach to the “grand experiment.” The second, Howard…

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The Enduring Relevance of Katyn

Why should we continue to talk about the Katyn Forest massacre of spring 1940, when over 25,000 Polish POW officers and other prisoners were slaughtered on the orders of Joseph Stalin? Indeed, why talk about the past at all? It is because nothing has changed: Historia magistra vita est. This includes the utility of Katyn to…

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Why Commemorate Pearl Harbor?

Nearly eighty years ago, the United States suffered one of the most disastrous moments in its history when Japan decimated the naval and air fleet sitting in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. As President Roosevelt told it to Congress the next day, the attack by hundreds of carrier-based planes was “a day which will live in infamy”…

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Pope Francis is Wrong about the Morality of Nuclear Weapons

According to a news article by the Religion News Service, Pope Francis recently told reporters that the use and possession of weapons should be made “immoral” under official Catholic teaching. This is not the first time the politically liberal Pope has categorically denounced nuclear weapons. Read more at ProvidenceMag.com

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Vladimir Bukovsky

Vladimir Bukovsky, the Defiant: RIP

An abbreviated version of this article was published by American Thinker. One of the first things famous Soviet dissident Vladimir Bukovsky (1942-2019) told me about himself was that his roots were Polish. After the crushing of the Kościuszko Insurrection of 1794, his ancestor, Pan Bukowski, was taken prisoner by the Muscovites and shipped off to…

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Uncommon Valor in a Skirt

To volunteer to serve a cause greater than ourselves propels the most noble of humans. The formidable Agnieszka Wisła aka Wizła (1887–1980), a naturalized American of Polish birth, ranks among the best of them. A community organizer, an educational worker, a military nurse, a combat veteran, a charity volunteer, an innovative businesswoman, and, above all,…

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History: The “Dead” Science Comes Alive

Americans are supposed to be “ahistorical” by nature, meaning that the subject has not preoccupied them as opposed to the more dynamic topics that fit in better with the momentum and optimism of the so-called American “dream.” Henry Ford, one of the architects of this dream, once called history “bunk,” as it had little to…

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