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Henry D. Sokolski is the Executive Director for the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center.
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Stop funding Russia’s nuclear weapons

As Washington and the commentariat wring their hands about Russian President Vladimir Putin’s nuclear sword rattling, the United States and the European Union (EU) continue to shovel hundreds of millions of dollars to Rosatom — a Russian nuclear firm that maintains Moscow’s nuclear weapons complex and just filched a $60-billion Ukrainian nuclear plant. Read more at The Hill

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Protect Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Plant Before It’s Too Late

The Additional Protocol I to the 1949 Geneva Convention offers a model, but the United States can’t denounce Russia until it embraces the norms it’s seeking to enforce. Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear power complex, which Russia captured early in the war, has been continually in the European and U.S. headlines since Russia turned it into a…

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Is Missile-Driven Deterrence the Solution to the War in Ukraine?

Kyiv’s supporters insist that more missiles of longer range are not a problem, but a solution. Ever since President Joe Biden first swore off fighting World War III (and creating no-fly zones over Ukraine), Washington nuclear intellectuals have enjoyed a momentary splash of relevance. Nuclear fear and loathing—i.e., nuclear mutual assured destruction and deterrence—are back.…

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Russian Invasion of Ukraine Spotlights the Dangers of Nuclear Reactors in War

The United States decided decades ago that nuclear reactors could not be defended from military attacks. Now, reactors in Ukraine are coming under fire during Russia’s invasion. Just as the terrorist attacks on 9/11 required a reexamination of how best to protect against terrorist airplane hijackings, Russia’s military assault on Ukrainian nuclear plants raises questions…

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“Fast Reactors” Also Present a Fast Path to Nuclear Weapons

New “fast reactors” promise sustainable nuclear energy. They also pose serious proliferation risks because they can make lots of plutonium. The Energy Department’s choice for the leading reactor design for reviving nuclear power construction in the United States is so at odds with U.S. nonproliferation policy that it opens America to charges of rank hypocrisy.…

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Bill Gates’ Fast Nuclear Reactor: Will It Bomb?

The principal reason for preferring fast reactors, historically the only reason, is to gain the ability to breed plutonium. Thus, the reactor would make and reuse massive quantities of material that could also be used as nuclear explosives in warheads. TerraPower, the nuclear company founded by Bill Gates, just announced an agreement with private funders, including Warren Buffet,…

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Military micro-reactors: Waging yesterday’s wars while losing the future’s

With its withdrawal from Afghanistan and decision to end programs that typified America’s conflicts of past two decades, the Biden administration’s Pentagon is planning for long-term competitions against China and Russia. But for the Pentagon’s mobile micro-reactor effort, Project Pele, it’s still 2007. Read more at Defense News

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Turkey’s Nuclear Reactor: A Tempting Target?

Accurate missiles and drones could knock down critical electrical supply lines to Turkey’s nuclear reactor and destroy its emergency generators, nuclear control rooms, reactor containment buildings, and spent reactor fuel buildings. Although it got little attention from the U.S. media, an explosion late last month at a Turkish nuclear power plant construction site raised eyebrows in…

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