John J. Tierney Jr. is a Professor Emeritus at IWP and Former Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
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Is NATO Necessary?

April 4, 2016 — NATO is sixty-seven years old and has suddenly become a major bone of contention in the Republican primary fight. Although some may welcome the notion that, at long last, the remaining three in this contest are tackling a serious strategic issue, the rancor still remains.

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How to fight a war without winning

Having left Southeast Asia in 1975 in a disastrous condition, the United States vowed “No More Vietnams,” the title of ex-President Nixon’s 1985 book. Since Nixon had supervised about half of the war, his view on its legacy fairly summarizes a more general consensus: once bitten, twice shy. 

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How to win a war without fighting

In the 1970s, the U.S. pursued a foreign policy of “détente,” guided by Henry Kissinger, that had some success, especially with China, but failed to stop the surge of Soviet strategic nuclear power and Soviet advances across the globe. 

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Geopolitical Determinism: Dominos

Traditional geopolitical theories have long concentrated on Europe as the center of their strategic universe, with the major exception of the sea power designs of the American naval officer, Alfred T. Mahan. But the classic geopoliticians have been Europeans. 

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The Far East: Geopolitics of the Open Door

The designation “Far East” for the United States is a geopolitical misnomer, a reflection of the powerful impact Great Britain has had upon the American worldview. If one would stand on the shores of San Francisco Bay, for example, and look across the Pacific, one would naturally be looking west. 

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Cold War Geopolitics: Containment

With the end of world war and fascism erased from the globe, the United States followed its instincts and disarmed. Once war is over, peace begins, Americans thought, and there was nothing in between. With 16 million uniformed personnel by war’s end in 1945, only 1.5 million remained by 1947. 

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American Geopolitics: The Origins

Unlike nations in the rest of the world, which are bound to one another by endless borders and border wars, the US had no natural enemies east or west, and only native tribal clans on its western extensions. 

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