John J. Tierney Jr. is a Professor Emeritus at IWP and Former Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
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Cold War Geopolitics: Containment

With the end of world war and fascism erased from the globe, the United States followed its instincts and disarmed. Once war is over, peace begins, Americans thought, and there was nothing in between. With 16 million uniformed personnel by war’s end in 1945, only 1.5 million remained by 1947. 

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American Geopolitics: The Origins

Unlike nations in the rest of the world, which are bound to one another by endless borders and border wars, the US had no natural enemies east or west, and only native tribal clans on its western extensions. 

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Is Banning Non-Americans Un-American?

There are several ways to critique Donald Trump’s recent call for a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States…” but “Un-American” has certainly summarized much of the emotional ire directed against his latest political bombshell. 

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The Impact of Pearl Harbor on America

Nearly three quarters of a century later, the words “Pearl Harbor” still have a unique meaning to the American people. The image of the sunken USS Arizona, where half of the 2400 casualties remain, still conveys one of the country’s most lasting symbols. But what does the image symbolize, and why is it lasting?

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The Best or Worst of Times

With the growth of ISIS, the recent Paris attacks, the threats to the American homeland, not to mention the racial unrest at home, plus practically everything else since September 11th, one could easily believe that the world has suddenly plunged into unprecedented chaos and violence.

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What’s In a Name?

The refusal of President Obama to use the “Islamist” or Muslim name to define global terror confuses and annoys many Americans. His supporters dismiss this as a trivial sideshow, claiming that names are distracting as long as tactics work.

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We Have Met the Enemy and He Is …. Us

I often open my class on U.S. foreign policy by asking the following (trick) question: In history, what is the Capital city that has come closest to an existential defeat of the United States? Hands go up: Moscow, Berlin, Tokyo, even London. 

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