John J. Tierney Jr. is a Professor Emeritus at IWP and Former Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
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Who Goes There, Friend or Foe?

The above question seeks the identity of the figure and whether he is shot or let in by the sentry. It is purely symbolic but, in a larger context, represents one of the enduring dilemmas of foreign policies, whether they be ours or theirs. Who is our friend, who is an enemy?

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Can Closed Minds Govern?

There has been much attention recently about the state of American education and the mindset of today’s “millennial” generation to appreciate the country they live in and the nature of the polity and culture.

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A World Restored

Dr. Kissinger’s first book was A World Restored, a history of the negotiations in Vienna (1815) that ended Europe’s chronic wars going back to the French Revolution (1789). 

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Latin America: The Forgotten Neighbor

The recent national obsession with the Mexican border has obscured a fact of even greater significance for American public attention. Within a general malaisein foreign policies since the end of the Cold War, the overall neglect of Latin America as a central focus has obscured an area which, from the beginning, played a central role in…

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Trump as Kaiser: The Need for a Doctrine

President Trump’s abrupt decision to relieve the 2,200 American soldiers from Syria is by-no-means life or death for global democracy, but the exaggerated reactions make it seem so. As for many of his behaviors, the style often destroys the substance. 

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Should There Be a Term Limit on Interventions?

President Trump’s abrupt decision to remove American forces from Syria produced a storm of critique from all quarters, left, right, and center. Defense Secretary James Mattis resigned almost immediately, while op-ed opinion from the “mainstream” media was almost universally opposed.

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Orwell Returns: “Me First, America Too”

The subtitle of this essay has reversed two main “movements” in the contemporary culture: “Me Too” and “America First.” The result is a modern example of what George Orwell originally labeled as “doublethink” in his classic novel, 1984.

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The “S” Word: Secession

The leadership of the revolt, from George Washington on down, had pledged loyalty to the Crown. They had now broken that pledge and thus were “traitors” by any definition.

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The Civil Cold War: What’s It All About?

A new acronym has crept into the vocabulary to describe our societal situation. A “Civil Cold War” has been used to describe the rapidly-growing schism between what may be called the “progressive” wing of society versus the “traditionalists.” 

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“Racism”: What’s in a Name?

In one of Shakespeare’s most famous quotations, Juliet asks Romeo “what’s in a name”?  Indeed, name-calling is a meaningless and artificial convention, attendant to children who quote the verse “… names will never hurt me.” But they can and are meant to, not physically, but psychologically.

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