John J. Tierney Jr. is a Professor Emeritus at IWP and Former Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
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National Security Candidates, Then and Now

The 2016 presidential race has focused largely on personalities and domestic issues, especially the economy, with national security policies obscured amidst sustained recriminations on the Benghazi incident and Donald Trump’s alleged reckless approach toward NATO, Russia and nuclear weapons. 

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Casualties of War

On July 6, 2016, the British Government, under the leadership of former government civil service official, John Chilcot, issued its definitive summary of the six-year (2003-2009) British occupation of Iraq.

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To Carry a Torch for Lady Liberty

There’s a reason why she carries a torch, and there a reason why July 4th is associated with fire and fireworks. That reason is embedded within the fabric of American history and the cause of liberty which, from the beginning, was seen as the political “torch” that would light a fire worldwide.

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Brexit: The second greatest British decision

On June 23, the British people will commit to the second greatest decision that they have been asked to make in over one hundred years: whether or not to remain in the European Union. “Brexit,” (“British exit”) has the potential to turn the entire international system on its head, including the very political/economic definition of…

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Memorial Day: One Lucky Country

As we celebrate Memorial Day this weekend, it might be prudent to remember what we are celebrating. The holiday, originally called Decoration Day, began during the Civil War as a time to remember those who fell, on either side. 

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Erasing History

Driving down Virginia’s John Mosby Highway recently, I wondered how long we will keep this name alive, given that Mosby was a fierce Confederate partisan during the Civil War. Should we rename the road? 

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Is NATO Necessary?

April 4, 2016 — NATO is sixty-seven years old and has suddenly become a major bone of contention in the Republican primary fight. Although some may welcome the notion that, at long last, the remaining three in this contest are tackling a serious strategic issue, the rancor still remains.

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How to fight a war without winning

Having left Southeast Asia in 1975 in a disastrous condition, the United States vowed “No More Vietnams,” the title of ex-President Nixon’s 1985 book. Since Nixon had supervised about half of the war, his view on its legacy fairly summarizes a more general consensus: once bitten, twice shy. 

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How to win a war without fighting

In the 1970s, the U.S. pursued a foreign policy of “détente,” guided by Henry Kissinger, that had some success, especially with China, but failed to stop the surge of Soviet strategic nuclear power and Soviet advances across the globe. 

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