Military Officers: Political Without Partisanship

The US military should refrain from seeking political power and avoid partisan politics. However, to insist that officers should remain apolitical ignores the fact that in the American system-policy making and the development of strategy on the one hand and the political process on the other-cannot be easily separated. 

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The limitations of a famous R.I. general

A recent story in the Journal describes the refurbishment of Providence’s equestrian statue of Ambrose Burnside, Rhode Island industrialist, Civil War general, governor and U.S. senator during the post-Civil War era.

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Most Lessons of War Are Eternal; Question Others

The primary lesson of the Vietnam War is that there are no lessons of the Vietnam War, at least when it comes to things we can learn that are unique to that conflict. War has an unchanging nature but each war has a character all its own. So it was with Vietnam.

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Who will check the ‘fact-checkers’?

A passage from my March 18 Commentary piece (“GOP senators simply cited Constitution”) about the “Open Letter to the Leaders of the Islamic Republic of Iran” by Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., and 46 cosigners has been “fact checked” by an organization called PolitiFact and judged to be “mostly false” (“PolitiFact: Did Ted Kennedy secretly work to…

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Reflections on Memorial Day

On Monday, we will mark the 141st anniversary of the first official observation of the holiday we now call Memorial Day, as established by General John A. Logan’s “General Order No. 11” of the Grand Army of the Republic dated May 5, 1868.

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