Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz is a Professor of History at IWP and holds the The Kociuszko Chair in Polish Studies. Full bio

Poets and Writers Have Power to Effect Change

The death of Adam Zagajewski (1945-2021) has made me reflect anew on the power of poets and writers. America’s most eminent 20th century conservative philosopher Russell Kirk called it “the sword of imagination.” And what a mighty weapon it is. Read more at Newsmax

Read More ›

Ukraine Simmers On

A shorter version of this article was published by Newsmax. Unless you are with the U.S. Helsinki Committee, which tends to keep tabs on such things, Ukraine is not a hot topic for you. When most Americans even think about Ukraine, they tend to associate it with Hunter Biden’s shenanigans, as in the latest allegations…

Read More ›

The Danish Way

A shorter version of this article was published by Newsmax.  A major immigration reform is afoot in Denmark. Yet, the mainstream media is rather reticent about it. That is not only because the story is an embarrassment to the consistently pushy narrative about “socialist” and “progressive” Denmark, but because the Danes make international news usually…

Read More ›

Fragmentation vs. Integration

Fragmentation in East-Central Europe: Poland and the Baltics, 1915-1929 By Klaus Richter Reviewed by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz Throughout history, empires have been the norm in international relations, while nation- states a rarity. Small and even medium nation-states exist at the whim of the imperial powers that be either as their temporary satellites or subordinates of…

Read More ›

Chinese Flag

EU Hopes for Fair Deal in China Trading Partnership – Good Luck

A shorter version of this article was published by Newsmax. It’s official now: China is the European Union’s largest trading partner. It has surpassed the United States. Beijing is happy. China understands Europe well and, consequently, has been busy cozying up to the Europeans collectively and to each nation-state individually. The Europeans dream about “a…

Read More ›

Should America Gift Poland a Nuclear Weapon?

A shorter version of this article was published by Newsmax. In Ghost Fleet, a science cyber-fiction thriller about our next war with China and Russia in the near future, NATO falls apart. After the United States is attacked, and Hawaii occupied by Red Chinese, the Europeans proclaim neutrality. That is, except for the Brits and…

Read More ›

The EU’s Vaccine Blues

A shorter version of this article was published by Newsmax. By May, the United States will have enough COVID-19 vaccine for its entire adult population. The Canadians and British are quickly catching up. In contrast, the European Union lags far behind. There are serious shortages virtually everywhere. Why? First, the EU is less than friendly…

Read More ›

What Happens When American-Style Lawsuits Go Global

A shorter version of this article was published by Newsmax. Suing is so American; others learn from us, including in the Intermarium, the lands between Black, Baltic, and Adriatic Seas. On occasion, the Three Seas region citizens even seek justice in American courts. Sometimes we sue at home in the U.S. to obtain a ruling…

Read More ›

A Czech Colt

A Czech arms company has bought America’s classic Colt. It is not a joke; it is a sign of times at several levels. First, American brands still have the magic. Second, foreigners feel safe enough to invest in American products. Third, at least at this level, capitalism works. And fourth, Czechia has come into its…

Read More ›

A Feminist Gulag

Marxist and feminist historian Katherine R. Jolluck may very well be a pioneer in applying her radical ideology to Polish studies in English. She has resolved, alas, to practice her deeply convoluted methodology on the history of Polish women in Stalin’s Gulag.  In her Exile and Identity: Polish Women in The Soviet Union During World War…

Read More ›