Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz is a Professor of History at IWP and holds the The Kociuszko Chair in Polish Studies. Full bio

Armenians and Azeris At It Again; US Should Stay Out

A low-level war has broken out anew between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the southeast of the Intermarium, in the Caucasus, just east of the Black Sea. Both sides blame each other for the outbreak of the hostilities. This unfrozen conflict is simply a continuity of the previous ones that have plagued the area since the First…

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Janos Esterhazy

A Saintly Underdog: Count János Esterházy

A shorter version of this article was originally published by Newsmax.  America usually sides with an underdog. When the underdog’s cause is righteous, our support tends to be unqualified. Sometimes we root for the collective underdog. That was the case, for example, with America’s fondness of Poland’s “Solidarity” and its fight for freedom against the…

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The September 1939 War: Polish Cavalry Charging, but not Tanks

First to Fight, The Polish War 1939 By Roger Moorhouse Case White, The Invasion of Poland 1939 By Robert Forczyk Reviewed by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz On September 1, 1939, Hitler attacked Poland; Stalin joined him on September 17. Thus, the Second World War commenced. From the start it was a war against two enemies: Germans, who were…

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Greece vs. Turkey: NATO’s Coming Split?

Greece is in trouble again for a variety of reasons, and the United States should care. Most importantly, in the foreign policy field, Hellas and Turkey have been at loggerheads forever. They are historic enemies. Yet, they are also members of NATO. Read more at Newsmax

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Trump Succeeded Herding Balkan Cats

Donald Trump has accomplished the nearly impossible: He successfully herded cats. These would be western Balkan cats in this instance. Thanks to the Trump administration’s labors, Kosovo and Serbia signed an economic treaty and, with the same breath, agreed to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, moving their embassies there. Prompted by the U.S., they also…

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Hungary: Good News at Last

Have you heard anything good about Hungary in mainstream media lately? As in the last 10 years? Neither have I. Usually, Budapest and conservative/populist government of Viktor Orbán tend to get a bad rap. Despite the fact that his FIDESZ party has won every single free election fair and square consecutively since 2010, there are…

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Belarus Opposition Churning

Have you heard this one from America’s leading post-Soviet expert and my colleague Paul Goble? “Elections in Belarus are like the Rocky films: with each new one, the main hero gets a little older but he still defeats everyone.” But Minsk ain’t Hollywood. Many people have had enough of sequels. There is a counter-revolution churning…

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Mike Pompeo and the Beast From the East

When U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo traveled for an official visit to Poland a week ago, the Poles were celebrating a centennial of their victory over the Soviet Union. Pompeo probably did know that there was a strong American connection, even a Hollywood one. In 1933 Merian C. Cooper produced his smash hit King…

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Belarus: Plot Thickens in Presidential Landslide

The bad news is that there have been riots every night in Belarus following the presidential election of August 10. And more bad news is also that we have a winner: President Oleksandr Lukashenka has triumphed again, and, after 26 years in the office, he is now officially in his sixth term. He will soldier…

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Lenin, Revolution, and the Jewish People

Antisemitism and the Russian Revolution by Brendan McGeever Reviewed by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz According to Brendan McGeever’s Antisemitism and the Russian Revolution (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2019), armed supporters of the Bolsheviks, in the Red Army in particular, were permeated with antisemitism which manifested itself in anti-Jewish propaganda and violence. Simply put, the rank-and-file…

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