Norman A. Bailey is a Professor of Economics and National Security at IWP and Former Senior Director of International Economic Affairs with the White House National Security Council.
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The Kurdish challenge

The Kurds are an ancient Indo-European people whose origin is unknown, but who have inhabited the area of the Zagros and Taurus mountains of the Middle East since the beginning of history. They are divided into clans and tribes and currently inhabit portions of Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran. The most famous Kurd in history…

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Obama, Romney, and military aid to Israel

“May God bless America, and may He bless and protect the Nation of Israel” (Governor Mitt Romney, Republican candidate for president of the US, Jerusalem, July 29, 2012).  With this extraordinary declaration, Mitt Romney, former governor of Massachusetts and Republican candidate for the presidency in November’s elections in the United States, gave the most ringing…

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Why Syria matters

The longer the Syrian chaos continues, the more dangerous will be the likely consequences. Commentators have been announcing the demise of the Assad regime for months, but it is not defeated. With the material support of Russia, Iran and Venezuela, and with China cheering on the sidelines and vetoing Security Council resolutions, it could hang…

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Run defense on gas?

A country rich only in brainpower, such as Israel, can perfectly well base a successful economy on technological innovation, and Israel has done so with great success, passing unscathed through the recent global economic and financial crisis.

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Shifting Middle East sands

Israel is under attack in the north and in the south. The geopolitics of the region is in a state of chaotic flux. Future developments are unclear but the factors that will determine them are known.

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Poverty will breed chaos in Egypt

The Egyptian electorate has just chosen a member of the Muslim Brotherhood to be president. Earlier, they had elected an overwhelmingly fundamentalist parliament. Were it not for the armed forces, Egypt would be on its way to joining the “one person, one vote, one time” group of elected civilian dictatorships.

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Strategy for an age of disorder

Entropy is the natural tendency of all things to “dis-integrate” unless held together by a counter-force. In international relations that counter-force is usually a hegemonic power, starting with the Pax Romana, and continuing with Byzantium, the Caliphate, Venice, Spain, Great Britain and the United States.

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Iran Strategy Brief: Iran’s Venezuelan Gateway

For years, the media and the U.S. government have repeated a familiar refrain: that the regime of now-ailing Venezuelan strongman Hugo Chavez, however annoying, poses no serious threat to the national security of the United States. Compelling evidence, however, suggests otherwise.

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Malign Neglect

The Menges Hemispheric Security Project of the Center for Security Policy Presents the Proceedings of the Second Annual Capitol Hill National Security Briefing on Latin America, focused on current challenges to democracy, human rights and regional stability in the context of threats to U.S. national security. 

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The US colossus with feet of clay

In an article on TheGlobalist.com, IWP Adjunct Professor Norman Bailey surveys the rise and fall of the “Pax Americana” of the post-Cold War era.  He asserts that the current crises troubling the US position in world affairs is because “we lost sight of and allegiance to the timeless principles of which the country was founded…

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