Paul Coyer serves as a Research Professor at The Institute of World Politics, as well as an Associate Professor at l’Ecole Speciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr, where he lectures on U.S. foreign and national security policy and on the role of religion and culture in international affairs. Full bio

When did America forget that it is America?

Amid the plethora of security threats the world is facing today, North Korea, with its fourth nuclear test on Jan. 6, long-range missile test on Feb. 7 and firing of short range missiles in late March, has been doing all it can in order to ensure that it gets its share of attention.

Read More ›

The Patriarch, The Pope And An Old Play From Russia’s Geopolitical Playbook

The recent meeting in Havana between Pope Francis and the Patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church Kirill held importance far beyond religion and historic church splits. The geopolitical reasons Russia wanted the meeting, and historical roots of Russia’s geopolitical play, which are wrapped up in Russia’s sacralized sense of national identity, are far more interesting.

Read More ›

How democracy has been given a chance in Venezuela

Although it didn’t receive as much attention on the part of Americans as it should have given its portent of positive change in our hemisphere, Venezuela recently held parliamentary elections that potentially marked the beginning of the end of the political dominance of the late Hugo Chavez’ socialist party, the Partido Socialista Unido de Venezuala (PSUV), with the…

Read More ›

China’s Move To End Its One Child Policy Is Too Little, Too Late

Yesterday, the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party, meeting to shape the 13th five year economic plan, announced the ending of China’s infamous jihua shengyu (planned fertility program), better known as its one-child policy. Xinhua briefly announced that “The change of policy is intended to balance population development and address the challenge of an ageing population.

Read More ›