Paul Coyer serves as a Research Professor at The Institute of World Politics, as well as an Associate Professor at l’Ecole Speciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr, where he lectures on U.S. foreign and national security policy and on the role of religion and culture in international affairs. Full bio

Chinese information warfare: Leveraging the power of perception

An important aspect of the Sino-American rivalry, yet one that has received very little attention, is “information warfare,” also known as “political warfare,” which is aimed at shaping the perceptions and thought processes, and therefore influencing the choices, of external actors in general and of one’s opponents in particular. In the Sino-American relationship, Chinese use…

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The good news about Kazakhstan you may have missed

With all of the negative economic news coming out of Central Asia, a rare and welcomed piece of good news went mostly under the radar this summer. In late July, the WTO General Council formally approved Kazakhstan’s accession, nearly twenty years after Kazakhstan began the negotiation process. Read more at Forbes.com

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China’s expanding reach and growing influence in Central and Eastern Europe

For the past couple of years, while everyone has been watching Vladimir Putin’s moves in Eastern Europe, China has been making increasing economic inroads on Russia’s periphery. Its economic dominance of Moscow’s traditional backyard, Central Asia, is well known, but less well known is its growing presence in other areas of Russia’s periphery, such as…

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US Government data breach exemplifies China’s cyber insecurities

Over the past several weeks, revelations that US government databases have been penetrated have been updated with the news that the intrusion is much worse than had been previously thought. It was initially reported that a little over four million current and former US government employees had their records accessed — and that figure rose,…

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Putin’s Holy War And The Disintegration Of The ‘Russian World’

Vladimir Putin and Alexander Dugin’s vision of “Holy Russia,” which is shared with the Russian Orthodox Church, sees Russia’s mission as being to expand its influence and authority until it dominates the Eurasian landmass by means of a strong, centralized Russian state aligned with the Russian Orthodox Church, championing “traditional” social values over against the cultural…

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China’s House of Cards

It seems that “House of Cards,” the political thriller produced by Netflix that has captivated so many in the United States and elsewhere around the world, has also captivated a very large audience in China. The show’s popularity there has been helped along by the Chinese government, which has enjoyed pointing to the deep level…

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Islamic extremism in Central Asia: Witch hunt, or genuine threat?

A growing sense of insecurity has been palpable in recent months in Central Asia due both to concerns of a security vacuum in Afghanistan caused by the ending of ISAF operations and the inability of the Afghan National Forces (ANF) to keep the Taliban from increasing its effective control of the areas of rural Afghanistan, as well…

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Belarus’ quandary: No longer Putin’s dependable ally?

Belarus has long had a reputation as “the last dictatorship in Europe,” for being the Kremlin’s lapdog, and for its generally anti-Western orientation. For several years, however, Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko has at times surprised observers by bucking Moscow and charting a more independent course. In the past year, the Russian takeover of Crimea and involvement…

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The media battle for hearts and minds in Russia and Central Asia

Does public opinion matter to authoritarian leaders? Just ask Vladimir Putin. Putin has shown great care in the past several months to hide the deaths of Russian soldiers killed in eastern Ukraine, where he has repeatedly promised that no Russian soldiers are being ordered to fight, in the face of a rising death count. Loved ones…

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