These pieces are produced by members of the IWP community, conveying perspectives on foreign policy, national security, intelligence, and other related issues. Please note that the views expressed by our faculty, research fellows, students, alumni, and guest lecturers do not necessarily reflect the views of The Institute of World Politics.

Iraq-Israel normalization move continues to mystify

We still know nothing about the obscure American NGO which brought together 300 prominent Iraqi Sunni and Shia leaders to urge Iraq to normalize relations with Israel. If I had written in this column a month ago that more than 300 prominent Iraqis, Sunni and Shia, tribal leaders and even government officials, were going to…

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A dilemma of our time: Fear sells

Rarely does one read a column that summarizes most political circumstances, good or evil, as succinctly and as helpful as David Von Drehle’s Oct. 6 op-ed “Fear sells. It’s our job not to give in to it.” Read more at The Washington Post

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Free trade with China is still good for us all

Despite pushback from both left and right, free markets should always be supported, because they free people to live out their potential—even in despotic regimes like China’s. Doug Irwin in his seminal book Free Trade Under Fire points out that Democrats and Republicans have historically vacillated on free trade. The Democratic Party of the late 19th century…

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Angelo Codevilla speaking in Prof. Ken deGraffenreid's intelligence course in August 1994

Angelo Codevilla, RIP

Above: Angelo Codevilla speaking in Prof. Ken deGraffenreid’s intelligence course at IWP in August 1994.  My initial contact with Angelo goes back nearly half a century when we both worked Capitol Hill as “conservative” staff on National Security issues, me in the House he in the Senate. In 1975, we shared a memorable year together…

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“Fast Reactors” Also Present a Fast Path to Nuclear Weapons

New “fast reactors” promise sustainable nuclear energy. They also pose serious proliferation risks because they can make lots of plutonium. The Energy Department’s choice for the leading reactor design for reviving nuclear power construction in the United States is so at odds with U.S. nonproliferation policy that it opens America to charges of rank hypocrisy.…

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The miraculous Biden

The failures of Joe Biden’s administration so far make even Donald Trump look good – a miracle if ever there was one. Recently, a friend referred to President Biden as a “miracle worker.” When queried as to what he meant, he replied, “Every day, he makes Trump look better and better. If that isn’t miraculous,…

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Why Do Poles Fight, Even When It is Hopeless?

I would like to reflect briefly on just two Polish last stands in the 20th century: the Battle of Zadwórze (August 17, 1920), during the Polish-Soviet War, and the Battle of Wizna (September 7-10, 1939) during the September Campaign of 1939.  The former last stand was against the Communists and the latter against the Nazis. Why…

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The Timing of Terrorism: The Obsessions with Dates

This month is the black anniversary of September 11, 2001.  It has many meanings for us, but was that date in particular selected by Al Qaeda?  A few suggest there is a link to the last day of battle in 1683 at the gates of Vienna, a titanic Moslem-Christian struggle for western Europe.  Americans might…

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‘Taipei’ or ‘Taiwan’? TECRO’s rectification of names

It is just a teensy-weensy change, a change of one little syllable. It is barely noticeable unless you’re watching really carefully: The Tai-“pei” Representative Office in Washington, D.C. (TECRO) could soon change its name — just ever so very slightly — to Tai-“wan” Representative Office. The office’s “TECRO” initials would remain the same. It will…

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