These pieces are produced by members of the IWP community, conveying perspectives on foreign policy, national security, intelligence, and other related issues. Please note that the views expressed by our faculty, research fellows, students, alumni, and guest lecturers do not necessarily reflect the views of The Institute of World Politics.

American ‘policy’ versus Chinese ‘principle’

Ned Price, spokesperson of the United States Department of State, is a Twitter influencer at the exalted “celebrity/macro” rank. So, even though it was well after working hours on Friday evening, May 20, 2022 — as Secretary of State Antony Blinken prepared for President Biden’s first presidential trip to Asia — Ned Price was sure…

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Arms Deliveries Not Enough; Biden Needs a Ukraine Strategy

The Biden administration lacks a Ukraine strategy. Instead, it zigzags and improvises. Though it pretends otherwise, the White House seems almost entirely reactive vis-à-vis the Kremlin. In May, the administration received from Congress a $40 billion package for Ukraine. A few days ago, another billion was thrown in. Let’s retrace Joe Biden’s moves on the Ukrainian…

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Globe

A Single Sentence that Changed Foreign Policy

There was once a time, and a long one, when Latin America was the singular area of U.S. interests. The first major assertion of any U.S. foreign policy goes back to President Monroe’s Doctrine (1823), which defined the entire hemisphere as under American strategic jurisdiction.  Originally, Monroe made only a statement of interest against foreign…

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(Mis)Understanding Nukes

This article was co-authored by Prof. Rebeccah Heinrichs, who teaches IWP’s course on Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control. Nuclear illiteracy has grown since the end of the Cold War. Russia’s nuclear saber-rattling directed at NATO while it continues its war against Ukraine has brought nuclear weapons back into public consciousness. Tom Nichols, author of the Death of…

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Admitting Sweden and Finland to NATO Makes Eminent Sense

During the upcoming NATO summit in Madrid, the members of the transatlantic alliance will decide about admitting Sweden and Finland. Is this in the interest of the United States? Some say it is not. But it tends to be the same neo-isolationist, national conservative voices that question our presence in Europe in general and prefer Russia over Ukraine in…

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Globe

Anticipation in Foreign Policy

“Remember this: anticipation is the ultimate power. Losers react; leaders anticipate.” -Tony Robbins Properly, the word anticipation is defined as the act of “looking forward to” or “an action that takes into account or forestalls a later action.” Can someone/something be held responsible for doing nothing when action might have forestalled/stopped some action in the…

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Is Missile-Driven Deterrence the Solution to the War in Ukraine?

Kyiv’s supporters insist that more missiles of longer range are not a problem, but a solution. Ever since President Joe Biden first swore off fighting World War III (and creating no-fly zones over Ukraine), Washington nuclear intellectuals have enjoyed a momentary splash of relevance. Nuclear fear and loathing—i.e., nuclear mutual assured destruction and deterrence—are back.…

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Give the people’s wealth to the people

Israel’s sovereign wealth fund, finally activated, should be used to narrow the country’s shockingly wide economic gaps. The Israeli government has finally activated the sovereign wealth fund that was authorized years ago to accumulate the levies collected under the Natural Resources Profits Law, chiefly from the companies and partnerships exploiting Israel’s offshore gas reservoirs. Read…

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Putin’s Russia created Europe’s worst refugee crisis

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has produced Europe’s gravest refugee crisis arguably since the Second World War. The Ukrainian disaster shares some similarities with other European migrant emergencies. The Third World’s illegal masses consistently burst into Spain, Italy, and France. They also endeavor to walk in, mostly via Greece and the Balkans. That was particularly…

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