Belarus Counter-Revolution Petering Out

It looks like the anti-post-Communist Counter-Revolution has slowly petered out in Belarus. Aleksandr “Daddy” Lukashenka has things pretty much under control. Sure, there are still riots and demonstrations, but the numbers of participants continue to dwindle from the greatest gathering in the nation’s history when, in mid-August, about 250,000 marched in Minsk. Read more at…

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U.S. Elections 2020: The United States in Afghanistan

This article was written by IWP student Arash Yaqin.  The February U.S.-Taliban agreement paved the way for an ending to America’s “endless wars” and the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan. The two-decade war, which cost the United States nearly 2,500 American lives and more than two trillion dollars, with arguably limited success, is considered the longest military engagement…

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Armenians and Azeris At It Again; US Should Stay Out

A low-level war has broken out anew between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the southeast of the Intermarium, in the Caucasus, just east of the Black Sea. Both sides blame each other for the outbreak of the hostilities. This unfrozen conflict is simply a continuity of the previous ones that have plagued the area since the First…

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The Boston Police Strike, A Harbinger for Today?

Boston On September 9, 1919, the Boston police force went on strike against what the police union called poor labor and wage conditions. The strike lasted five days and to this day represents the first and only organized police strike in American history. But considering the conditions in cities today, with calls for defunding and…

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New Year: the good, the bad, and the ugly

As the Jewish New Year gets under way, it’s time to assess whether things will get any better in coming months As the Jewish New Year begins, we should look backward and forward in time to decide what is good, what is bad, and what is ugly. Looking backward, the last category is easy. This past…

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Janos Esterhazy

A Saintly Underdog: Count János Esterházy

A shorter version of this article was originally published by Newsmax.  America usually sides with an underdog. When the underdog’s cause is righteous, our support tends to be unqualified. Sometimes we root for the collective underdog. That was the case, for example, with America’s fondness of Poland’s “Solidarity” and its fight for freedom against the…

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Abraham Lincoln Statue

Divisions

“A house divided against itself cannot stand.” – Abraham Lincoln, 1858 Lincoln Lincoln first brought up the danger of “a house divided” when he announced it “cannot stand” in the 1858 Senate debate in Illinois. Although he was referring to slavery, the analogy is timeless and universal and has been proven accurate in countless situations,…

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The September 1939 War: Polish Cavalry Charging, but not Tanks

First to Fight, The Polish War 1939 By Roger Moorhouse Case White, The Invasion of Poland 1939 By Robert Forczyk Reviewed by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz On September 1, 1939, Hitler attacked Poland; Stalin joined him on September 17. Thus, the Second World War commenced. From the start it was a war against two enemies: Germans, who were…

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Greece vs. Turkey: NATO’s Coming Split?

Greece is in trouble again for a variety of reasons, and the United States should care. Most importantly, in the foreign policy field, Hellas and Turkey have been at loggerheads forever. They are historic enemies. Yet, they are also members of NATO. Read more at Newsmax

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