IWP 688
Two credits

This course attempts not only to chart through the transformation of energy use over the past century, but also, most importantly, to expand our understanding of today’s concept of “energy security” and “geopolitics of energy” and how they fit within the rubric of national security. This is a multi-disciplinary course with the goal achieving an analytical perspective on global energy security and geopolitics of energy, supply and demand, and prices. It provides a comprehensive introduction to the global energy market and different aspects of the oil and gas industry, provides an overview of the distribution and allocation of petroleum resources, and examines how access to these resources is facilitated and achieved.

Energy security and geopolitics of energy are the major points of discussion in this course. Yet it is broad enough to touch upon regional politics, economic markets, political strategy, and even technological developments. Understanding the broad definition of the concept of “energy security,” its principles, and its elements is the other goal of this course. In this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of the function of the energy market, crude oil and natural gas pricing and trade, and the major drivers of energy prices. By the end of the course, students will be able to assess and measure risks and define different scenarios for energy security in the context of national security for an individual country or a region.

Professor

Semester Available

Fall

Additional Information

This course may be taken as a part of the following programs:

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