Deporting Russia's Past: The Anti-Polish Operation of the NKVD

by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz  |  December 6, 2017  |  ARTICLES

Under a pretext of destroying a non-existent Polish spy organization, the "nationalities" extermination action of the NKVD, which took place USSR-wide and not just in selected localities, was launched by Stalin and his henchmen as part of the Great Terror and was proportionally the greatest peace time genocide of an ethnic minority in the Soviet Union in the interwar period. Vladimir Putin and his goons can try to bury the truth, but the truth will always come out, even if it gets deported from Russia.

On Friday, November 24, 2017, KGB successor, the FSB, snatched and deported Polish historian Henryk Głębocki (pronounced Glembotski). Retroactively, Moscow has claimed that this was allegedly a tit-for-tat operation: a retaliation for Warsaw's expulsion of a Russian scholar. In fact, this was a proactive, and not a reactive, blow to keep Russia's past buried. The operation itself had tell-tell marks of active measures (aktivnye meropriatya), post-Soviet secret police monkey business short of violence, a provocation (provokatsya).

A Jagiellonian University at Cracow scholar, Professor Głębocki devoted 23 years to research continuously in the Russian archives. His special field of interest is the 19th century, but he also is an expert on the Communist secret police. This year alone he traveled three times to the Russian Federation, and not only to large cities but also the countryside, including Siberia. We should know. We have been working on projects in the post-Soviet zone, including Russia, since 1991. Głębocki has been a long-time friend (we both were involved with the anti-Communist underground Independent Students Union (NZS) during martial law in Poland in the 1980s) and a co-operator of the Kościuszko Chair of Polish Studies and the Center for Intermarium Studies at the Institute of World Politics (IWP): A Graduate School of National Security and International Affairs in Washington. We hosted him in the U.S., and he reciprocated in Poland.

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