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Recent findings on Poland’s former president, Lech Walesa, confirm research by Dr. Marek Chodakiewicz

In 2009, Dr. Marek Jan Chodakiewicz, professor at The Institute of World Politics, wrote a paper on the former president of Poland, Lech Walesa, which discusses in depth Walesa’s involvement with the Communist Secret Police in Poland during the 1970s and 1980s — involvement which has recently come to the fore based on newly seized documents.  Dr. Chodakiewicz’s paper, entitled Agent Bolek, was published in the Intelligencer: Journal of U.S. Intelligence Studies.

In his paper, Dr. Chodakiewicz touched on Walesa’s capricious nature and his ongoing deception to his friends and country both before and during his presidency. Lech Walesa was registered with the Soviet Secret Police as a collaborator (codename Bolek) and continued to have ties to Communists, despite the fact that he was a legendary anti-communist leader in Poland and ultimately brought down Communism in Poland and parts of Europe. Dr. Chodakiewicz also pointed out that Walesa feigned a right-wing stance to become elected into office and then jettisoned the right once he was elected. Dr. Chodakiewicz concluded that although Lech Walesa’s contributions to Poland’s independence are without a doubt incredible, Walesa never apologized for his misdeeds, and the cover-up of his involvement with Communist Poland has been foolish.

When Dr. Chodakiewicz wrote this paper in 2009, he predicted that Walesa’s deceptions would be brought to light; he was indeed correct.

In the past 24 hours, there have been dozens of news sources reporting on Walesa’s extensive involvement with the generally-hated communist secret police, even though he has insisted he never informed on anyone or took any money. BBC News printed, “Lech Walesa was a paid Communist informant,” and the New York Times printed, “Walesa would not face criminal charges but the party says it wants to expose people who have never acknowledged their moral responsibility.”

Dr. Chodakiewicz writes weekly columns for popular Polish press and contributes to the SELOUS Foundation. He has also published on foreign policy in various venues, including The Journal of World Affairs, American Spectator, and National Review Online.

His piece on Lech Walesa can be read here: Agent Bolek