Doctorate Program

52 Credit Hours (beyond an MA)
Three years to complete with full-time student status

The Doctor of Statecraft and National Security (Professional) (DSNS) is a degree tailored towards national security professionals, as opposed to those who wish to pursue a teaching career. In contrast to most Ph.D. programs, it avoids extreme specialization in favor of a broad-gauged understanding of the integrated use of the instruments of national power to achieve the ends of policy.

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Doctor of Statecraft and National Security Requirements

To earn the degree of Doctor of Statecraft and National Security, the student will:

  • Successfully complete the required courses and electives. All DSNS courses are taught as enhanced versions of our MA courses, which entail: extra readings; a more challenging exam; a longer, more robust paper; and an additional 4-6 meetings with the professor outside of the MA class, which can occur during office hours, and the length can be based on the professor’s judgment of the student’s needs.
  • Pass both written and oral comprehensive exams in each area of study: 1) Principles of Statecraft and Strategy; 2) Functional specialty; and 3) Regional specialty. Note: A student will complete the Principles of Statecraft area of study first. Once he or she has completed the required paper and passed the exam, the student may then take courses in both the Functional and Regional areas of study.
  • Deliver a paper of 75 pages that demonstrates mastery in each area of study (three 75-page papers in total).

The program is designed to provide students with the flexibility to customize their curriculum according to their interests and needs. This degree is not meant as preparation primarily for teaching, but for those who are or who wish to become national security professionals.

IWP doctoral students are required to take 52 credits within 3 areas of study: Principles of Statecraft and Strategy (20 credits); Functional Concentration (16 credits); Regional concentration (16 credits)

Principles of Statecraft and Strategy

20 credits

Three required classes, totaling 8 credits:

  • 6060 (enhanced version of IWP 606): Ideas and Values in International Affairs Two credits
  • 6080 (enhanced version of 608): Sources of American Political Thought Two credits
    Note: Students who have taken either 606 or 608 (or both) should consult with their doctoral advisors to identify suitable substitutions.
  • 6900 Principles of Strategy

Two of the following classes, 4 credits each:

  • 6090 (Enhanced version of IWP 609): Economic Statecraft and Conflict
  • 6280 (Enhanced version of IWP 628): Military Strategy: Theory and Practice
  • 6360 (Enhanced version of IWP 636): The Art of Diplomacy
  • 6370 (Enhanced version of IWP 637): Public Diplomacy and Strategic Influence
  • 6050 (Enhanced version of IWP 605): Intelligence and Policy

IWP 9900 Thesis research/ writing, 4 credits

Functional Concentration

16 credits

  • Any combination of enhanced classes equaling 12 credit hours (Note: Selected courses will automatically have the number ‘0′ added to the end of the course number to indicate doctoral level.)
  • 9900 Thesis research/ writing, 4 credits

Regional Concentration

16 credits

  • Any combination of enhanced classes equaling 12 credit hours (Note: Selected courses will automatically have the number ‘0′ added to the end of the course number to indicate doctoral level.)
  • 9900 Thesis research/ writing, 4 credits

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Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate an extensive understanding of the national security field, to include history, theories, and geography related to national security policy, process and implementation.
  2. Students will demonstrate mastery of the art of strategic thinking and the ability to integrate military strategy, the diplomatic art, economic strategy, intelligence, counterintelligence, public diplomacy, and strategic influence into a coherent whole.
  3. Students will demonstrate a detailed understanding of the culture, political landscape, security challenges, and U.S. interests in a selected region of the world.
  4. Students will demonstrate mastery of one of the major tools of statecraft (diplomacy; economics; public diplomacy and strategic influence; intelligence; military).
  5. Students will demonstrate a profound understanding of the main ideological currents of the modern era and their impact on US and foreign behavior.
  6. Students will demonstrate extensive knowledge of the principles of the American founding and their relevance to U.S. national security and foreign policy.
  7. Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge and appreciation of the Western moral tradition and its applicability to national security and foreign policy.
  8. Students will master the ability to assess arguments, identify logical flaws, and obtain supporting or corrective information.
  9. Students will demonstrate the use of clear, effective and persuasive written communications.
  10. Students will demonstrate the use of clear, effective, and persuasive oral communication.

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